Drilling and Tapping on the shopsmith

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11 years 4 months ago #9037 by reible
reible created the topic: Drilling and Tapping on the shopsmith
Hi,

My project of the day was to take the mounting plate from my Woodhaven Angle Ease and drill some holes in it so I could mount some levelers (set-screws) in it.

I was so happy how the set-screw levelers worked on the Jointech system and since the Angle Ease is going to find a home in the Jointech router table this seemed like a really good idea. (Please keep in mind the table is phenolic, I'm not so sure how well set-screws would work on a someting like MDF??)

You can follow along with the pictures at:
flickr.com/photos/12199425@N02/sets/72157604371990960/

The first thing I needed to do was remove the base from the rest of the Angle Ease. The first picture shows what it looks like with the screws out and ready to be taken apart. I marked the position for the holes on the mountng plate. The set-screws are a 1/4-20 so looking in the table I found I needed a #7 drill. I also knew I wanted the holes centered 1/4\" back from the edge. I set the drill press up with the rip fence back the 1/4\" and stacked some scrap under where I was going to drill. This is what you see on the second and third pictures. The reason for the fence is that dimension is now controlled, and I can then look at the less critical location along the fence knowing the more critical one is taken care of. Another question you might have is way have why have the plate so high, why not use some 3/4\" stock and keep it lower. Two reason for that choice, one being the less distance for quill travel and second to make sure the chuck doesn't hit the fence.

Now we get to something cool again. This is a trick that I was shown when I was working in a machine shop. It is hard to keep the tap from tipping a bit this or that way when you tap the hole... that is especially when getting it started. The trick here is to use the quill of the shopsmith to keep everything square. First make sure the plug is unplugged... sorry no power tapping. Next you chuck the tap making sure you are on the round part of the tap. Also notice in the 4th picture that I have left up the fence... you will need this or some other way of controlling the part you want to tap. Your hands will be busy doing other things so as can be seen in photo 5 a clamp will hold the part in place.

Since you have a shopsmith you might find it easier to mount a sanding disk and turn that to do the tapping. Other wise you can use the chuck key or any other of several ways to turn the tap. Photo 6 shows the disk.

Since I was out working by myself I could not get any action shots but I hope you can picture how this goes. First you use the quill feed to put some down pressure on the tap while the other hand turns the tap. You keep the pressure on with the quill and just like any tapping operation you do the back turn to break the chip. You can tap the hole to full depth or stop about half way and with a back pressure on the quill you back the tap out.

It is easier on you to do the hole only about half way then finish with the normal tap handle once all the holes are done. Going about half way makes sure the hole will be straight unless you really mess up the hand tapping part of it. Photo 7 shows the finishing of the holes. (Keep in mind a small burr might form will need to be removed).

I now put the Angle Ease back together and since some of you may not know about these I took a couple of extra pictures. The next two pictures show it set for first 7 deg. then reset to 15 deg. This allows for all sorts of new profiles and other fun projects. (If I get some time this summer I show you a few of the things it can do). The last picture show what the bit would look like tipped at 15 deg. This is one of the cases where the fence and router plate need to be square to each other so expect to see an attachment to the 520 rip fence sometime soon.

If you got lost on the tapping part let me know I can try and get more pictures... sure could use another set of hands or maybe a video setup so you can see how easy this is to do.

Ed

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11 years 4 months ago #9049 by AZ IRONWOOD
AZ IRONWOOD replied the topic: Re:Drilling and Tapping on the shopsmith
Re placing reliable (keyword) threads into anything which may distort, while manipulating the treaded part. This will undoubtedly/eventually/usually result in tear-out of the threads, therefore no longer accepting proper retention of the threaded object. If the theaded hole is relative close to an edge, 'break-out' of that portion of the hole closest to that edge will commonly occur, since that's where the material will 'give', compared to the rest of the material. Recommend using typical threaded brass (other materials available) inserts be used. This will avoid enumerated potential problems. For multi-talented folks, these inserts are somewhat like 'Heli-coils'. Retain using selected glue/cement for the material receiving the inserts.

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11 years 4 months ago #9051 by reible
reible replied the topic: Re:Drilling and Tapping on the shopsmith
Hi,

I'm not to sure what Ironwood was saying but rest assured phenolic is one material that can be and is drilled & tapped all the time. In an application like this you are well within established engreering guidelines.

The holes are quite close to the edge and if one wanted to use a brass insert (btw they are also threaded in) it would not work with 1/4-20 set screws. In fact I don't think that a steel one would work either... getting quite close there.

I should also point out that if you do happen to do the router plate insert like was shown the set screws need to have a blue thread lock applied. The vibrations otherwise but cause you to have a randon self adjusting plate (RSAP pronounced r'sap), and no you don't want one of those.

Ed

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