Topic-icon BUFFING/POLISHING

More
3 years 8 months ago #11435 by AZ IRONWOOD

If you've added a polishing/buffing wheel [either the felt style, or the spiral-sewn stacked cotton style] to your 'arsenal' of accessories, here are just a few handy uses which can be readily performed. You can get several types/grades of polishing stick compounds (jewelers' red rouge, white rouge, Tripoli, and others) at your local hardware store; if not stocked, they can order whatever you need. The specific choice of type is dependent upon your particular project at hand; be it plastic or metal, or what have you. I do most everything; therefore have an assortment of wheels/compounds.

Have some tarnished silverware ?, a scratched watch crystal ?, an heirloom pocket watch ?, jewelry needing refurbishing ?, or how about those CD's/DVD's which are a little worse for wear ? They all can be brought back to new [or near new] condition, with minor effort. If you've not developed proficiency, then be sure to practice on items which are of no consequence; if you happen to "accidently" destroy them. Use the lowest speed necessary, and be EXTREMELY diligent, as the wheel can catch your project, and convert it into a high-speed missile ricocheting around the room. On most projects, I find applying the white rouge {called 'loading'} to the wheel, happens to be my favorite compound. It is NOT recommended to 'load' a wheel, with more than a single type of compound; therefore obtain several wheels, and marking each as to its' specific compound is a very good idea.

'Addressing' the project to the wheel, begins at the outermost center face, about 35>45 degrees below center of rotation [firmest/aggressive region], then sideways/outwards [softest/least aggressive region]. Use more pressure at center, then lighten up outwards. When doing some projects (such as CDs'/DVDs'), hold the item at an ~45 degree angle, to the softest portion & with absolutely minimum pressure. The end result is a combination of the items' material, selected compound, wheel speed, portion of the wheel used, amount of & duration of pressure applied, illumination, your experience, etc.. Good luck.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.145 seconds
Powered by Kunena Forum